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Showing posts from November, 2013

25. MY HELPLESSNESS :

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AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY:
THE STORY OF MY EXPERIMENTS WITH TRUTH
by Mohandas K. Gandhi



It was easy to be called, but it was difficult to practise at the bar. I had read the laws, but not
learnt how to practise law. I had read with interest 'Legal Maxims', but did not know how to apply
them in my profession. 'Sic utere tuo ut alienum non laedas' (Use your property in such a way as
not to damage that of others) was one of them, but I was at a loss to know how one could employ
this maxim for the benefit of one's client. I had read all the leading cases on this maxim, but they
gave me no confidence in the application of it in the practice of law.


Besides, I had learnt nothing at all of Indian Law . I had not the slightest idea of Hindu and
Mahomedan Law. I had not even learnt how to draft a plaint, and felt completely at sea. I had
heard of Sir Pherozeshah Mehta as one who roared like a lion in law courts. How, I wondered,
could he have leant the art in England? It was out of the question…

24. 'CALLED' —BUT THEN? :

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AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY:
THE STORY OF MY EXPERIMENTS WITH TRUTH
by Mohandas K. Gandhi



I have deferred saying anything up to now about the purpose for which I went to England, viz.,
being called to the bar. It is time to advert to it briefly.


There were two conditions which had to be fulfilled before a student was formally called to the
bar: 'keeping terms', twelve terms equivalent to about three years; and passing examinations.
'Keeping terms' meant eating one's terms, i.e., attending at least six out of about twenty-four
dinners in a term. Eating did not mean actually partaking of the dinner, it meant reporting oneself
at the fixed hours and remaining present throughout the dinner. Usually of course everyone ate
and drank the good commons and choice wines provided. A dinner cost from two and six to three
and six, that is from two to three rupees. This was considered moderate, inasmuch as one had to
pay that same amount for wines alone if one dined at a hotel. To us in India it is a …

23. THE GREAT EXHIBITION :

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AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY:
THE STORY OF MY EXPERIMENTS WITH TRUTH
by Mohandas K. Gandhi


There was a great Exhibition at Paris in 1890. I had read about its elaborate preparations, and
I also had a keen desire to see Paris. So I thought I had better combine two things in one, and go
there at this juncture. A particular attraction of the Exhibition was the Eiffel Tower, constructed
entirely of iron, and nearly 1,000 feet high. There were of course many other things of interest,
but the Tower was the chief one, inasmuch as it had been supposed till then that a structure of
that height could not safely stand.
I had heard of a vegetarian restaurant in Paris. I engaged a room there and stayed seven days.
I managed everything very economically, both the journey to Paris and the sight-seeing there.
This I did mostly on foot and with the help of a map of Paris, as also a map of and guide to the
Exhibition. These were enough to direct one to the main streets and chief places of interest.
I remember nothing of the Ex…

22. NARAYAN HEMCHANDRA :

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AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY:
THE STORY OF MY EXPERIMENTS WITH TRUTH
by Mohandas K. Gandhi


Just about this time Narayan Hemchandra came to England. I had heard of him as a writer.
We met at the house of Miss Manning of the National Indian Association. Miss Manning knew that
I could not make myself sociable. When I went to her place I used to sit tongue-tied, never
speaking except when spoken to. She introduced me to Narayan Hemchandra. He did not know
English. His dress was queer--a clumsy pair of trousers, a wrinkled, dirty brown coat after the
Parsi fashion, no necktie or collar, and a tasselled woollen cap. He grew a long beard.
He was lightly built and short of stature. His round face was scarred with small-pox, and had a
nose which was neither pointed nor blunt. With his hand he was constantly turning over his beard.
Such a queer-looking and queerly dressed person was bound to be singled out in fashionable
society.


'I have heard a good deal about you,' I said to him. 'I have also read some of…

21. * 'NIRBAL KE BALA RAMA'-(1) :-

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AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY:
THE STORY OF MY EXPERIMENTS WITH TRUTH
by Mohandas K. Gandhi






Though I had acquired a nodding acquaintance with Hinduism and other religions of the world,
I should have known that it would not be enough to save me in my trials. Of the thing that
sustains him through trials man has no inkling, much less knowledge, at the time. If an
unbeliever, he will attribute his safety to chance. If a believer, he will say God saved him. He will
conclude, as well he may, that his religious study or spiritual discipline was at the back of the
state of grace within him. But in the hour of his deliverance he does not know whether his spiritual
discipline or something else saves him. Who that has prided himself on his spiritual strength has
not seen it humbled to the dust? A knowledge of religion, as distinguished from experience,
seems but chaff in such moments of trial.



It was in England that I first discovered the futility of mere religious knowledge. How I was
saved on previous occasions is mor…

20. ACQUAINTANCE WITH RELIGIONS :

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AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY:
THE STORY OF MY EXPERIMENTS WITH TRUTH
by Mohandas K. Gandhi


20. ACQUAINTANCE WITH RELIGIONS :


Towards the end of my second year in England I came across two Theosophists, brothers,
and both unmarried. They talked to me about the Gita. They were reading Sir Edwin Arnold's
translatio--The Song Celestial--and they invited me to read the original with them. I felt ashamed,
as I had read the divine poem neither in Sanskrit nor in Gujarati. I was constrained to tell them
that I had not read the Gita, but that I would gladly read it with them, and that though my
knowledge of Sanskrit was meagre, still I hoped to be able to understand the original to the extent
of telling where the translation failed to bring out the meaning. I began reading the Gita with them.


The verses in the second chapter :-
If onePonders on objects of the sense, there springs
Attraction; from attraction grows desire,
Desire flames to fierce passion, passion breeds
Recklessness; then the memory--all betrayed--
Let…

19. THE CANKER OF UNTRUTH :

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AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY:
THE STORY OF MY EXPERIMENTS WITH TRUTH
by Mohandas K. Gandhi



There were comparatively few Indian students in England forty years ago. It was a practice
with them to affect the [role of] bachelor even though they might be married. 

School or college
students in England are all bachelors, studies being regarded as incompatible with married life.
We had that tradition in the good old days, a student then being invariably known as
a brahmachari./1/ But in these days we have child-marriages, a thing practically unknown in
England. Indian youths in England, therefore, felt ashamed to confess that they were married.



There was also another reason for dissembling, namely, that in the event of the fact being known
it would be impossible for the young men to go about or flirt with the young girls of the family in
which they lived. The flirting was more or less innocent. Parents even encouraged it; and that sort
of association between young men and young women may even be a necessity there, …

18. SHYNESS MY SHIELD -

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AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY:
THE STORY OF MY EXPERIMENTS WITH TRUTH
by Mohandas K. Gandhi




I was elected to the Executive Committee of the Vegetarian Society, and made it a point to
attend every one of its meetings, but I always felt tongue-tied. Dr. Oldfield once said to me, 'You
talk to me quite all right, but why is it that you never open your lips at a committee meeting? You
are a drone.' I appreciated the banter. The bees are ever busy, the drone is a thorough idler. And
it was not a little curious that whilst others expressed their opinions at these meetings, I sat quite
silent. Not that I never felt tempted to speak. But I was at a loss to know how to express myself.
All the rest of the members appeared to me to be better informed than I. Then it often happened
that just when I had mustered up courage to speak, a fresh subject would be started. This went
on for a long time.



Meantime a serious question came up for discussion. I thought it wrong to be absent, and felt it
cowardice to register a s…